9/11: I Was Sitting in History Class the Day the World Stood Still

14316998_943458459719_7529318405299079198_nI was in history class the day the world stood still. I witnessed, on television, the destructive moments that would mark the start of an incessant war against Western civilization, an attack on the freedoms we had all come to know.

My teacher had postponed the day’s lesson in favor of this crisis of international proportions. As I witnessed the emblazoned images on the TV screen, which was hanging in the upper-left corner of our classroom, I recalled thinking to myself “this must be a dream.”

It was not.

At least seven people from my hometown of Livingston, New Jersey, perished in that terrorist attack. It was the first time in my life that I had felt sorrow, anger and determination simultaneously.

Fear was not an option.

I knew I was living through history. I also realized that I had received a brazen introduction to an enemy that would become more familiar than I’d ever hoped for.

Something awakened in me that day. While I was born in America and identify as an American of Persian ethnicity, I felt a renewed sense of pride and obligation to this nation and our allies throughout the world who uphold the values that make this country so great.

Over the coming years, I would equally yearn to find a way to help those living under the oppressive nature of hatred and fear to rise up and embrace the concept that they, too, could experience the same liberties and freedoms that every human being should be granted.

The Manhattan skyline I had grown up with would never be the same. Those two great pillars were physically gone. But the force that had been created in their absence continues to remind me of why we fight for our freedoms. It is often said that in someone’s absence, we learn to appreciate them.

September 11 is a constant reminder for us to appreciate and hold on to those 12 great pillars granted to us by our founding fathers in the U.S. Constitution: National sovereignty, natural law, self-evident truth, equality, inalienable rights, the inalienable right to life, the inalienable right to liberty, the inalienable right to private property, the primary purpose of government being subscribed as the protection of these inalienable rights, popular sovereignty, federalism and states’ rights and Divine Providence.

Never forget: No nation on earth was born great. It was made great. America is no exception. And it is precisely that humble thinking that makes us exceptional.

-Adelle M. Nazarian

(This post was originally published in Breitbart News: http://www.breitbart.com/…/2…/09/11/breitbart-remembers-911/)

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‘Acela’ration: Donald Trump Declares Himself Presumptive Republican Nominee

Donald Trump at Trump Tower
Donald Trump at Trump Tower in Manhattan, NY

NEW YORK, NY — Donald Trump announced that he is the Republican Party’s presumptive nominee from his own Trump Tower in Manhattan, on Tuesday night following a clean sweep of Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island in what has been dubbed the “Acela Primary”.

“I consider myself the presumptive nominee,” Trump said to the crowd of reporters and supporters who had gathered. “As far I’m concerned, it’s over. These two guys don’t have a path,” he said of his fellow Republican presidential contenders Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) and Ohio Gov. John Kasich.

Tuesday’s primary was dubbed “Acela” because the five states that held primaries on that day coincide with the route of Amtrak’s speediest carrier.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former Sen. Scott Brown (R-MA) were among those present in the crowd.

In addition to thanking his constituents in the states he won, Trump jestfully extended his gratitude to the media for covering him “very fairly… for the past two hours.”

Trump’s wins in the Northeast were indicative of his ability to pander to a diverse constituency; a point he made no secret of during his victory speech.

“Every state is so different,” Trump said, noting that “this is one diverse victory.”

After he addressed Cruz and Kasich, Trump took direct aim at the Democratic Party’s presumptive nominee, Hillary Clinton, while foreshadowing a more in-depth strategy for his foreign policy platform. Both during a press release and in his remarks on Tuesday evening, Trump said he will address national security and other pressing issues during a noontime Wednesday press conference at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C.

“I will do far more for women than Hillary Clinton will ever do, including protecting our country” Trump said. “The only card she has is the woman’s card,” he added. “And frankly, if Hillary Clinton were a man I don’t think she’d get five percent of the vote.” Clinton has benefited from support from females over her Democratic presidential rival Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) who has far greater backing from millennials in addition to being the more popular candidate.

A McClatchy-Marist poll released earlier this month indicates that 25% of Sanders supporters say they would not vote for Clinton if she were to become the Democratic nominee.

In order for Trump to cinch the Republican Party’s nomination outright, he must achieve 1,237 delegates. After tonight’s primary, he is clocked in at 1,055 leaving him just 182 delegates away from achieving that goal.

Trump also addressed the issue of immigration in his speech. “And, by the way, I want people to come into our country. But I want them to come in legally. They have to come in through a process.”

Follow Adelle Nazarian on Twitter @AdelleNaz